Earth Science Lecture 3: The Extinction of the Dinosaurs and the Importance of Rare Events

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In this final lecture of three in the Frontiers of Science unit on climate change, Columbia University Professor Peter deMenocal discusses the scientific exploration of the nature of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event. He explores the alternative hypotheses for the event that have been put forward over the years and provides examples of current supporting evidence. The lecture also emphasizes how dogma can be the enemy of scientific progress when it causes scientists to see what they expect to see instead of what the data actually shows. A lecture transcript and companion PowerPoint presentation are also available on FoSO.

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Earth Science Lecture 3: The Extinction of the Dinosaurs and the Importance of Rare Events

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In this last of three lectures in the Frontiers of Science unit on climate change, Columbia University Professor Peter deMenocal discusses the scientific exploration of the nature of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event. He explores the alternative hypotheses for the event that have been put forward over the years and provides examples of current supporting evidence. The lecture also emphasizes how dogma can be the enemy of scientific progress when it causes scientists to see what they expect to see instead of what the data actually shows. A lecture video and companion presentation are also available on FoSO.

Earth Science Lecture 3: The Extinction of the Dinosaurs and the Importance of Rare Events

Discipline:
Resource type:

Cretaceous Earth impact drawing.

In this last of three lectures in the Frontiers of Science unit on climate change, Columbia University Professor Peter deMenocal discusses the scientific exploration of the nature of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event. He explores the alternative hypotheses for the event that have been put forward over the years and provides examples of current supporting evidence. The lecture also emphasizes how dogma can be the enemy of scientific progress when it causes scientists to see what they expect to see instead of what the data actually shows. A lecture video and transcript are also available on FoSO.

Biodiversity Lecture 1: What is the Problem? or “The Great Unraveling”

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What is the Problem? or “The Great Unraveling”

In this first lecture video of three in the Frontiers of Science unit on biodiversity, Columbia University professor Don Melnick identifies ecological problems on a global scale, such as degradation of land and aquatic ecosystems, accumulation of greenhouse gases, decline of species and emerging infectious diseases. The basic science behind investigating the problems facing humans in the twenty-first century is discussed at 3 different scales: gene, species and ecosystem. A lecture transcript and companion presentation are also available on FoSO.

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Biodiversity Lecture 3: How Do We Fix It? or “A Reversal of Fortune”

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How Do We Fix It? or “A Reversal of Fortune”

In this third lecture video of three in the Frontiers of Science unit on biodiversity, Columbia University professor Don Melnick provides examples of ecological restoration at the scale of genes, species, and ecosystems and discusses the important role that experiments and large-scale studies play in understanding complex systems. A lecture transcript and companion presenttion are also available on FoSO.

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Biodiversity Lecture 3: How Do We Fix It? or “A Reversal of Fortune”

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In this third lecture of three in the Frontiers of Science unit on biodiversity, Columbia University professor Don Melnick provides examples of ecological restoration at the scale of genes, species, and ecosystems and discusses the important role that experiments and large-scale studies play in understanding complex systems. A lecture video and companion presentation are also available on FoSO.

Biodiversity Lecture 1: What is the Problem? or “The Great Unraveling”

Discipline:
Resource type:

In this first lecture of three in the Frontiers of Science unit on biodiversity, Columbia University professor Don Melnick identifies ecological problems on a global scale, such as degradation of land and aquatic ecosystems, accumulation of greenhouse gases, decline of species and emerging infectious diseases. The basic science behind investigating the problems facing humans in the twenty-first century is discussed at 3 different scales: gene, species and ecosystem. A lecture video and companion presentation are also available on FoSO.

Biodiversity Lecture 3: How Do We Fix It? or “A Reversal of Fortune”

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 Reforesting in Brazil.

In this presentation, the third of three in the Frontiers of Science unit on biodiversity, Columbia University professor Don Melnick provides examples of ecological restoration at the scale of genes, species, and ecosystems and discusses the important role that experiments and large-scale studies play in understanding complex systems. A lecture video and transcript are also available on FoSO.

Biodiversity Lecture 1: What is the Problem? or “The Great Unraveling”

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Resource type:

Deforestation and burning in Madagascar.

In this presentation, the first of three in the Frontiers of Science unit on biodiversity, Columbia University professor Don Melnick identifies ecological problems on a global scale, such as degradation of land and aquatic ecosystems, accumulation of greenhouse gases, decline of species and emerging infectious diseases. The basic science behind investigating the problems facing humans in the twenty-first century is discussed at 3 different scales: gene, species and ecosystem. A lecture video and transcript are also available on FoSO.

Biodiversity Seminar 1b

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Depletion of fish stocks.

This teaching guide provides ideas for an alternative or additional seminar to include in a unit on biodiversity. The topics included in this guide are related to species decline in aquatic ecosystems. The guide contains an overview of the seminar, a reading list, and a step-by-step seminar plan, including suggested discussion questions, activities, and references to associated assignments. The related assignment questions are provided in an accompanying file.